THE PROJECT
Cosmopolitan Physically Disabled (Champions of Destiny), under the umbrella of the Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation is established in Ghana as a charitable Trust Deed, duly registered on 21st February, 2014 at the Registrar-General's Department in Accra with the registration number CG089012014. On the 16th January, 2015, the foundation's name was changed from Mawuena Foundation to Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation.
We strive to bring out people with disability, their God-given potentials and talents which must be tapped through education, empowering them to become indispensable assets to themselves, their family, the nation of Ghana and the rest of the world, where they are no more social liabilities, grooming them to the height of the finest leaders the world can produce.
We are based on the reality that every human being is a unique individual and that we all have a right to good health and basic needs and should access means to a comfortable life in one way or another. We aim at providing a voice platform for action on the concerns of physically disabled, social justice, poverty reduction through self-help initiatives to achieve sustainable development. We will create innovative programs, conduct research, public education, training, and advocacy campaigns; and provide tools and technical assistance. We will be building a unique bonding platform for physically disabled, in protecting their human rights as well as nurturing their hidden intellectual, artistic and entrepreneurial skills.
We believe strongly in the potential of disabled people to lead meaningful lives. With proper attention, training and care, the vast majority of the disabled can overcome their disadvantaged position and contribute to society. The key in taking care of the disabled is their empowerment. Examples of programs of the Cosmopolitan Physically Disabled are: technical assistance, training, bursaries and scholarship, exchange of experiences, consultative trips, legislation, human rights, disabled children promotion, disabled women promotion, inclusive education, functional rehabilitation, institutional development, sports, arts  and culture and leisure. We will improve physical and psychological rehabilitation and other crucial services for disabled people and their families  through our NGO Cosmopolitan Miracle Hospitals with the assistance of Orthopedic Surgeons, Neurologists and Neurosurgeons, physical therapists, occupational therapists and speech therapists and psychologists.
The adult physically disabled can be held in a hostel project as resident students for a limited period in our empowerment center (usually between 1-4 years). During this time, the students are taught vocational skills at the resource center in various income generating activities that fit with their capabilities, improve their self-confidence and spirit and prepare them to venture independently after graduation. They can be taught visual arts and rural craft. They can learn  vocations, including and not limited to dressmaking, shoe making, radio mechanics, leather work and carpentry.  They can learn computer science, electronics  and all activities that do not entail constant movement from one place to another and those who excel from the very beginning will be encouraged to advance their education and give them scholarships to make it to the university.
The Board of Trustees of the Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation, led by Dr. Emmanuel Yao Voado, MD., the Founder, will select the Management Committee that will see to the day to day administration of the Cosmopolitan Physically Disabled. He is a Ghanaian neurosurgeon trained in Cuba. He was the medical doctor who first opened a neurosurgical service in the country of Belize. He practiced there for 5 years and worked in the United States for 6 years before relocating to Africa in September, 2013. He is working diligently on the cure of Spinal Cord Injuries.
The Cosmopolitan Physically Disabled will be headquartered in Tsopoli in the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area of Ghana.
1. THE SUMMARY
Cosmopolitan Physically Disabled (Champions of Destiny), under the umbrella of the Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation was established in Ghana as a charitable Trust Deed, duly registered on 21st February, 2014 at the Registrar-General's Department in Accra with the registration number CG089012014. On the 16th January, 2015, the foundation's name was changed from Mawuena Foundation to Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation.
We pursue breaking the backbone of generational poverty where the captives of destiny, the marginalised, shall become the frontliners. Our purpose is to bring out of the people with disability, their God-given potentials and talents which must be tapped through education, empowering them to become indispensable assets to themselves, their family, the nation of Ghana and the rest of the world, where they are no more social liabilities, grooming them to the height of the finest leaders the world can produce. We are based on the reality that every human being is a unique individual and that we all have a right to good health and basic needs and should access means to a comfortable life in one way or another.
We aim at providing a voice platform for action on the concerns of physically disabled, social justice, poverty reduction through self-help initiatives to achieve sustainable development. We will create innovative programs, conduct research, public education, training, and advocacy campaigns; and provide tools and technical assistance. We will be building a unique bonding platform for physically disabled, in protecting their human rights as well as nurturing their hidden intellectual, artistic and entrepreneurial skills.
The Board of Trustees of the Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation, led by Dr. Emmanuel Yao Voado, MD., the Founder, will select the Management Committee that will see to the day to day administration of the Cosmopolitan Physically Disabled. He is a Ghanaian neurosurgeon trained in Cuba. He was the medical doctor who first opened a neurosurgical service in the country of Belize. He practiced there for 5 years and worked in the United States of America for 6 years before relocating to Africa in September, 2013. He is working diligently on the cure of Spinal Cord Injuries. The headquarters of the Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation will be located in Bundase in the Greater Accra Region.
2. ABOUT GHANA

Ghana is located in Western Africa and borders Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, and Togo. This country occupies a total area of 238,533 square kilometers and has a population of approximately 29,786,408 as of January 5, 2019. The population of West Africa is estimated at 387,246,061 people as of January 8, 2019.

Formed from the merger of the British colony of the Gold Coast and the Togoland trust territory, Ghana in 1957 became the first sub-Saharan country in colonial Africa to gain its independence. Ghana endured a series of coups before Lt. Jerry RAWLINGS took power in 1981 and banned political parties. After approving a new constitution and restoring multiparty politics in 1992, RAWLINGS won presidential elections in 1992 and 1996 but was constitutionally prevented from running for a third term in 2000. John KUFUOR of the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) succeeded him and was reelected in 2004. John Atta MILLS of the National Democratic Congress won the 2008 presidential election and took over as head of state, but he died in July 2012 and was constitutionally succeeded by his vice president, John Dramani MAHAMA, who subsequently won the December 2012 presidential election. In 2016, however, Nana Addo Dankwa AKUFO-ADDO of the NPP defeated MAHAMA, marking the third time that the Ghana’s presidency has changed parties since the return to democracy.

Economy:

Ghana has a market-based economy with relatively few policy barriers to trade and investment in comparison with other countries in the region, and Ghana is endowed with natural resources. Ghana's economy was strengthened by a quarter century of relatively sound management, a competitive business environment, and sustained reductions in poverty levels, but in recent years has suffered the consequences of loose fiscal policy, high budget and current account deficits, and a depreciating currency.
Agriculture accounts for about 20% of GDP and employs more than half of the workforce, mainly small landholders. Gold, oil, and cocoa exports, and individual remittances, are major sources of foreign exchange. Expansion of Ghana’s nascent oil industry has boosted economic growth, but the fall in oil prices since 2015 reduced by half Ghana’s oil revenue. Production at Jubilee, Ghana's first commercial offshore oilfield, began in mid-December 2010. Production from two more fields, TEN and Sankofa, started in 2016 and 2017 respectively. The country’s first gas processing plant at Atuabo is also producing natural gas from the Jubilee field, providing power to several of Ghana’s thermal power plants.
As of 2018, key economic concerns facing the government include the lack of affordable electricity, lack of a solid domestic revenue base, and the high debt burden. The AKUFO-ADDO administration has made some progress by committing to fiscal consolidation, but much work is still to be done. Ghana signed a $920 million extended credit facility with the IMF in April 2015 to help it address its growing economic crisis. The IMF fiscal targets require Ghana to reduce the deficit by cutting subsidies, decreasing the bloated public sector wage bill, strengthening revenue administration, boosting tax revenues, and improving the health of Ghana’s banking sector. Priorities for the new administration include rescheduling some of Ghana’s $31 billion debt, stimulating economic growth, reducing inflation, and stabilizing the currency. Prospects for new oil and gas production and follow through on tighter fiscal management are likely to help Ghana’s economy in 2018.
GDP (purchasing power parity): $134 billion (2017 est.)
GDP (official exchange rate): $47.02 billion (2017 est.) (2017 est.)
GDP - real growth rate: 8.4% (2017 est.)
GDP - per capita (PPP): $4,700 (2017 est.)

GDP - composition, by end use:

household consumption: 80.1% (2017 est.)

government consumption: 8.6% (2017 est.)

investment in fixed capital: 13.7% (2017 est.)

investment in inventories: 1.1% (2017 est.)

exports of goods and services: 43% (2017 est.)

imports of goods and services: -46.5% (2017 est.)

GDP - composition, by sector of origin:
agriculture: 18.3% (2017 est.)
industry: 24.5% (2017 est.)
services: 57.2% (2017 est.)

Agriculture - products: cocoa, rice, cassava (manioc, tapioca), peanuts, corn, shea nuts, bananas; timber
Industries: mining, lumbering, light manufacturing, aluminum smelting, food processing, cement, small commercial ship building, petroleum
Industrial production growth rate: 16.7% (2017 est.)

Labor force: 12.49 million (2017 est.)

Labor force - by occupation:
agriculture: 44.7%
industry: 14.4%
services: 40.9% (2013 est.)

Inflation rate (consumer prices): 9.6 % ( July,2018.)

3. ABOUT AFRICA
Africa is the second-largest continent about 30.2 million km2 (11.7 million sq. mi), after Asia, in size and population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, both the Suez Canal and the Red Sea along the Sinai Peninsula to the northeast, the Indian Ocean to the southeast, the Atlantic Ocean to the west and Europe to the north. The continent includes Madagascar and various archipelagos.
The population of Africa is estimated at 1.30 billion people as of 2018 accounting for about 16.64% of the world's human population. Africa's population is the youngest among all the continents; 50% of Africans are 19 years old or younger. The median age is 19.4 years. 41% of the population is urban. Algeria is Africa's largest country by area and Nigeria is the largest by population.
Africa, particularly central Eastern Africa, is widely accepted as the place of origin of humans and the Hominidae clade (great apes), as evidenced by the discovery of the earliest hominids and their ancestors, as well as later ones that have been dated to around seven million years ago.History:
At about 3300 BC, the historical record opens in Northern Africa with the rise of literacy in the Pharaonic civilization of Ancient Egypt. One of the world's earliest and longest-lasting civilizations, the Egyptian state continued, with varying levels of influence over other areas, until 343 BC.Climate:
Africa straddles the equator and encompasses numerous climate areas; it is the only continent to stretch from the northern temperate to southern temperate zones.
The climate of Africa ranges from tropical to subarctic on its highest peaks. Its northern half is primarily desert, or arid, while its central and southern areas contain both savanna plains and very dense jungle (rainforest) regions. In between, there is a convergence, where vegetation patterns such as Sahel and steppe dominate. Africa is the hottest continent on earth and 60% of the entire land surface consists of dry lands and deserts.Politics:
Today, Africa contains 54 sovereign countries, nine territories and two de facto independent states with limited or no recognition. Connected with the Indian Ocean, the islands of Africa are the Union of the Comoros, Republic of Madagascar, Republic of Seychelles, and Republic of Mauritius. In the Atlantic Ocean we have Republic of Cape Verde, Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe. Others are Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, and Eritrea.
The vast majority of African states are republics that operate under some form of the presidential system of rule. The improved stability and economic reforms have led to a great increase in foreign investment into many African nations, mainly from China, which has spurred quick economic growth in many countries, seemingly ending decades of stagnation and decline.
Some seven African countries are in the top 10 fastest growing economies in the world. If you look at countries like Mozambique, Angola, Ethiopia, Zambia, and Togo – all of those markets have shown exceptional growth and real stability and with that you almost get a new investment climate for these countries. This allows you to have a new emerging middle class and with that comes a very vibrant entrepreneurship culture, businessmen or women who want access to technology and to innovate.Natural Resources:
The continent is believed to hold 90% of the world's cobalt, 90% of its platinum, 50% of its gold, 98% of its chromium, 70% of its tantalite, 64% of its manganese and one-third of its uranium. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has 70% of the world's coltan, a mineral used in the production of tantalum capacitors for electronic devices such as cell phones. The DRC also has more than 30% of the world's diamond reserves. Guinea is the world's largest exporter of bauxite.Economy:
From 1995 to 2005, Africa's rate of economic growth increased, averaging 5% in 2005. Some countries experienced still higher growth rates, notably Angola, Sudan and Equatorial Guinea, all of which had recently begun extracting their petroleum reserves or had expanded their oil extraction capacity.
Several African economies are among the world’s fastest growing as of 2011. As of 2013, these are some of the Africa countries growing by more than 5.0% in real Gross Domestic Product (GDP). These are South Sudan, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Rwanda, Mozambique, Eritrea, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Gabon, Burkina Faso, The Gambia, Mauritania, Niger, Congo, Zambia, Angola, Uganda, Togo, Nigeria, Morocco and Kenya.
Africa really has the ideal conditions for steady economic growth. A skyrocketing population made up of predominantly younger people is the perfect recipe for a booming economy.
In 2018 we continue to see the same trend for population growth. Compared to 2017, African’s overall population has increased by more than 30 million – 1,256,268,025 in 2017 versus 1,287,920,518 in 2018.
The World Bank’s projections for the sub-Saharan Africa area. According to their 2018 projections for the continent: regional GDP growth of 3.2% (compared to 2.4% last year) is expected this year and an even greater increase of 3.5% is forecasted for 2019.
That’s why keeping an eye out for the top African countries with the fastest economic growth in 2018 is a total must for every potential investor. The abundance of natural resources and a young workforce is what has driven the economic surge on the continent in recent years.
A significant number of 2018’s top performers are non-commodity intensive economies. The list is led by Ghana, followed by Ethiopia and Côte d’Ivoire, with Senegal, Tanzania and Djibouti occupying the fourth, fifth and sixth spots respectively. Africa has six of the world’s ten fastest growing economies this year, according to the World Bank.
The latest forecast places East African country, Ethiopia at 8.2 percent with the West African nation, Ghana leading the continent at 8.3 percent. Topping the list from the first to the tenth position are: Ghana, Ethiopia, Côte d’Ivoire, Senegal, Tanzania, Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso, Benin, Rwanda and Niger.
As the growth in Africa has been driven mainly by services and not manufacturing or agriculture, it has been growth without jobs and without reduction in poverty levels.

4. PERSONAL PROFILE
Born in 1971 to a Christian family of scarce resources in Tefle, Volta Region, Ghana, he always dreamed of breaking the back bone of poverty through education. At the age of 12, he received a prophecy that he would be going abroad to further his education. In 1985, at age 14, the prophecy was accomplished but not without difficulties. After taking the exams to send students to Cuba, he placed first in his district but was unlawfully replaced by the son of the most powerful politician of the district. A concerned citizen sent him to the office of President Jerry John Rawlings, when he was allowed to participate in the national test in which he became first. This event was indeed a shock to many.
He was in Cuba for 17 years, right from the junior high school to the medical school and subsequently to the postgraduate specialist course of Neurosurgery. While in Cuba as a student, he continued the brilliant academic work; he won many awards including best student in Chemistry at the Cuban National Level Quizzes for 3 consecutive years where students from 35 countries then studied. He wrote an Organic Chemistry book which was meant for the preparation of the high performance students who aspired to participate in the World Olympiad of Chemistry. He was summa cum laude (first) in all the levels of education including the medical school and the Specialty of Neurosurgery. At the end of the neurosurgical training, he wrote another book in the field of Spinal Surgery called Lumbosacral Discopathies.
When he completed the Neurosurgical course in 2001, the people of Belize found him and took him to that country as they needed Neurosurgical Services which they had never had the privilege of enjoying locally. He performed simple and complex surgeries on many people including the elite of Belize with no surgical mortality in his 5 consecutive years of practice. In the USA, under Dr. Robert Grossman, a well-known neurosurgeon, he worked as a Clinical Research Specialist where he was invited by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons of America to present six papers in their international conferences.
He is Belizean and American citizen by naturalization. After 28 years, he has decided to come back to Africa to help his people as he has come to the convincing realization that he is more needed here than in the United States of America.
5. TRACK RECORD
Dr. Emmanuel Voado, MD., is a Ghanaian neurosurgeon trained in Cuba. He was the medical doctor who first opened a neurosurgical service in the country of Belize. He practiced there for 5 years before going to the United States where he resided with his family for 6 years before relocating to Africa in September, 2013.
In Cuba, he was directly involved in the educational system for 17 years and impacted by their health care delivery for 11 years which can all be emulated by third world countries like Ghana who have more natural resources and foreign exchange earners than Cuba. He saw the Cuban government training thousands of students of foreign nations in different courses at the polytechnic and university levels, who then went to their home countries to contribute to their development.
He lived in Belize where he contributed to the healthcare delivery in that nation. Once in the USA, he was personally impacted by all the good things of the American system. One area is the safety network to cater for the destitute. He saw the compassionate character of the Americans in the hospitals and churches which were the two environments he worked and worshiped and he saw how the two organizations will selflessly use their vacation days to go about doing good to the impoverished nations giving out their substance and technical knowhow.
He was deeply touched by this spirit of selflessness and all this helped to shape his world view in the subconscious level till he came to the conscious realization that a meaningful life is not being rich, being popular, being highly educated or being prefect...It is about being real, being humble, being able to share ourselves and touch the lives of others. It is only then that we could have a full, happy and contented life. That is the motive why, by divine grace, he had been able to abandon the lucrative and most rewarding jobs in the Diaspora and now back home to give back to his people.
6. THE PROBLEM
The physically disabled are people who have a problem with their body that makes it difficult for them to do things that other people can do easily. Limited access to education, unemployment,stigmatisation, social exclusion, negative socio-cultural perception and poverty are only few of the challenges facing the physically disabled.
People with disabilities often face discrimination in everyday life. They are excluded and rejected because of their physical disabilities. Get to know one of them and see the world through his eyes.
About ten percent of the world population live with a disability. Although, plainly visible in African cities, the physically disabled are often overlooked as they try to earn their living by begging. Some disabled are even locked up by their families, because they are considered to be a disgrace or even a curse by evil spirits.
Conventions certainly protect disabled people. However, the majority continue to encounter barriers within society. They face discrimination in social, economic and cultural life and are frequently denied their right to participate politically and to express their opinion freely.
5.1 The Current Context of the Physically Disabled in Ghana
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there are more than 1 billion disabled persons in the world, of which approximately 80% live in low-income countries. In most developing countries, including Ghana, disabled persons constitute an impoverished marginalised group,characterised by lack of access to public health, public buildings, education, and other social services that would ideally support and protect people with disabilities. Economically as well as in social terms, disabled persons in developing countries are classified among the poorest of the poor.
People with disabilities in Ghana are often regarded as unproductive and incapable of contributing in a positive way to society, and rather seen as constituting an economic burden on the family and the society at large, which leaves them in a vicious cycle of poverty.
In developing countries there are rarely strong disability movements actively working to improve the living conditions for people living with disabilities. Disabled persons are often only weakly represented in civil society and Ghana is no exception.
No accurate national survey has been carried out to determine the disability rate in the country. The WHO estimates the disability rate of Ghana to be between 7 and 10 per cent, which equates approximately 1.55 – 2.2 million people in the country. Earlier surveys of individual districts by the Ghana Human Development Scale (GHDS) in 1993 and the Norwegian Association of the Disabled (NAD) in 1998 and 1999 indicated that:
• The three most prevalent types of disability are those related to visual impairment, hearing impairment and physical disabilities.
• The disability rate is the same for males and females.
• The rate is higher in rural areas than in urban areas.
• The rate is lowest in the 0 to 5 years age group and highest for persons who are 50 years of age or older.
In Ghana, the 2010 Population and Housing Census puts the population of severely disabled persons at 3% (737,743). This means that the population of Persons With Disability (PWD) could as well be between 15 and 20%. An estimated 70% of persons with disability live in rural areas and thus encounter a lot of challenges in their participation in decision making and general access to information, resources and opportunities.
In 2012, the estimate was that more than 5 million people with disabilities live in Ghana, one-fifth of the total population, including 2.8 million people with mental disabilities.
7. THE SOCIETAL NEED
There are only few institutions in Ghana for the physically disabled and the government cannot do this alone, so it is important that concerned citizens and NGOs come together to step up the little that has been done in our society for them, taking it to another level.
It is identified that the low literacy rate among the disabled is the reason for their inability to demand their rights and disabled children have to be enrolled in school and the adults empowered to reverse the trend.
This programme will be appealing to the physically disabled persons to stop depending on begging as a means of their survival. We shall take them from the streets to acquire skills that will enable them to work to support themselves and their families. The physically disabled which are on our streets run the risk of being knocked down by motor vehicles in traffic whilst they roll on their locally fabricated wheels and wheel chairs.
The hidden intellectual potentials in these physically disabled is incalculable. Their artistic potentials are unrecognisable. Let us not continue to throw money at them because they will continue to come and run the risk with their lives on the street every time if we do not empower them to contribute meaningfully to the development of the country. “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.”
We need to conduct effective disability advocacy, community barrier removal and public education campaigns; develop programs and national policies; and create networks and national coalitions to promote the full inclusion of people with disabilities into all aspects of society. By doing this, the physically disabled will cease to be liabilities and become indispensable assets to our society.
The aim is to support and empower physically disabled people who have no other forms of support in society to develop necessary skills to live independent lives.
The need for this service is the same as that of the Disability Act which provides guidelines for the relevant sectors on how they should respond to the needs of PWDs:
• To educate Ghanaians on the rights, potentials and responsibilities of both society and PWDs
• To generate and disseminate relevant information on disability
• To create an enabling environment for the full participation of PWDs in national development
• To ensure access of PWDs to education and training at all levels
• To facilitate the employment of PWDs in all sectors of the economy
• To promote disability friendly roads, transport, and housing facilities
• To ensure access of PWDs to effective health care and adequate medical rehabilitation services
• To ensure that women with disabilities enjoy the same rights and privileges as their male counterparts
• To ensure that law enforcement personnel in cases of arrest, detention, trial and confinement of PWDs take into account the nature of their disabilities
• To encourage full participation of PWDs in cultural activities
• To ensure access of PWDs to the same opportunities in recreational activities and sports as other citizens
• To promote Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) Programmes as a means of empowering and ensuring the full participation of PWDs in society.
8. TECHNICAL PROPOSAL

8.1 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT
We believe strongly in the potential of disabled people to lead meaningful lives. With proper attention, training and care, the vast majority of the disabled can overcome their disadvantaged position and contribute to society. The key in taking care of the disabled is their empowerment.
Examples of programs of the Cosmopolitan Physically Disabled are: technical assistance, training, bursaries and scholarship, exchange of experiences, consultative trips, legislation, human rights, disabled children promotion, disabled women promotion, inclusive education, functional rehabilitation, institutional development, sports, arts and culture and leisure.
We will improve rehabilitation and other crucial services for disabled people and their families. Through our non-governmental organisation (NGO) Cosmopolitan Miracle Hospitals by the input of the Orthopaedic Surgeons, Neurologists and Neurosurgeons, physical therapists, occupational therapists and speech therapists, we shall assist in the rehabilitation of the physically disabled.
The adult physically disabled can be held in a hostel project as resident students for a limited period in our empowerment centre (usually between 1-4 years). During this time, the students are taught vocational skills at the resource centre in various income generating activities that fit with their capabilities, improve their self-confidence and spirit and prepare them to venture independently after graduation. They can be taught visual arts and rural craft.
They can learn vocations, including and not limited to dressmaking, shoemaking, radio mechanics, leather work and carpentry. They can learn computer science, electronics and all activities that do not entail constant movement from one place to another and those who excel from the very beginning will be encouraged to advance their education and give them scholarships to make it to the university.
As a form of guaranteeing their employment after the school, we shall have a style of manufacture of souvenirs industries where they can have a readily accessible source of job. Their products will be bought by the tourists who will visit The Kingdom City. We shall organize micro financing for those who would like to venture as entrepreneurs to open their own businesses with assessors made available to them for guidance and coaching for the start-up.
The School for the Blind and the Deaf:
The school will be established for the purpose of providing comprehensive educational services for children ages 3-21, which are blind/low vision and/or deaf/hard of hearing providing opportunities to participate in a variety of athletic and leadership development activities. Students participate in extracurricular activities such as music, championship sports, tutoring sessions, field trips, drama, clubs and various recreational activities. The full-time students live on campus during the week and go home on the weekends. There will be no tuition, room or board fee for students whose families cannot afford it. We will take advantage of their tender age to infuse self-confidence into them to attain the highest level of education.
We will prepare students for competitive or supported employment upon graduation through a variety of career exploration and on and off campus work experiences during the year and in their respective hometowns in the summer.
Residential Life. There is much going on after school, as there is during school hours. And it’s all about learning. The residential aspect of the school is a major factor in helping our students learn how to respect themselves, their peers and their community. For some students, it will be the first time, they have to spend with other people who are deaf or hard of hearing or blind — so they begin to learn what they can dream about, what goals they can achieve.
In the process of all this learning, they are playing on the playground, swimming, skating, bowling, doing arts and crafts. They will be a Play Therapy Centre on the campus, where they can crawl through tunnels and wiggle through obstacles or play in a big pit filled with brightly coloured plastic balls. This centre will be a physical therapy facility, but it will be so much fun going through the mazes and slides and playing in the ball pit.
Positive peer groups meet to encourage students to work together. Outdoor gardening skills will be explored with a small group of friends. Dorm activities include weight lifting and walking, and informal talks on topics like social issues and jobs shall be available. A friendly competition between different dorms called “Dorm Wars” will let students collect points for grades and behaviourto win big prizes and trophies after school. Each dorm celebrates birthdays and other special occasions. Dances, field trips and activities fill up the afternoons, with at least an hour every evening reserved for homework and study.
A shop can be opened as a vocational training program to teach kids about the assistive technologies and social skills needed to run a retail establishment. It will teach the skills they need for handling money to be more experienced with social interactions. It is obvious that even though it is our dream to affect the lives of all the physically disabled in the country, this would not be possible at the beginning so there will be outreach programmes to communities where physically disabled live from time to time to give them bags of rice, cooking oil, soap, clothes, etc.
The Foundation will be calling on governments to fill the gaps in data collection on numbers, ages, lifestyles, needs and roles of physically disabled a specific category in national action plans, as well as criminalise all actions by state or non-state actors that deprive physically disabled of their rights. This is done through awareness programmes, radio/TV projects, training/capacity building, advocacy, research, publication, networking, media and consulting services.
8.2 TARGET GROUP
The physically disabled include:
1. By accidents (amputees) and different diseases
2. By deformity (congenital). Among them are acondroplastics, the "little men"
3. Deaf
4. Blind
5. Mentally retarded
8.3 LOCATION
Accra, the capital of Ghana, is furthermore the anchor of a larger metropolitan area, the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area (GAMA), which is home to about 4 million people, making it the largest metropolitan conglomeration in Ghana by population, and the eleventh-largest metropolitan area in Africa.
The headquarters of the Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation will be located in Bundase in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. This is going to be the site for the new international airport which will become the center of West Africa to the world in the travel and pleasure industry. Apart from this huge international airport, there will be an Airport City with skyscrapers of the Dubai style, the seat of the government and all the ministries, an Olympic Stadium among other infrastructures.
We are acquiring 25, 000 acres of land extending from the Volta River to an area behind the new International Airport to be built in Bundase, to build The Kingdom City which will englobe all the structures of the Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation. As coalition builders, in the effort of making our projects become auto-sustainable in the future, we will work co-operatively with all individuals and groups, for profit and not for profit corporations and organisations, with government agencies and international bodies committed to the fight to extend help to the needy, subject only to the policies and priorities set by our governing bodies.
9. SYNERGY
We are grounded on the values of Integrity, Compassion, Accountability, Respect and Excellence (I CARE) principle. We shall become a force at the forefront of fighting the cause of the physically disabled in Ghana and from Ghana to the international stage.
We are both grounded in the various United Nations human right declarations and commitments to promote the effective and full implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities worldwide.
With your collaboration we both strive to:
• support and empower physically disabled people who have no other forms of support in society to develop necessary skills to live independent lives.
• eliminate barriers to full social integration and increase employment, economic security, and health care for persons with disabilities. Cosmopolitan Physically Disabled will create innovative programs and tools; and conduct research, public education, training, and advocacy campaigns; and provide technical assistance.
• engage people in their own development, in an authentic way; they have real ownership and power to change their lives and the lives of the people around them.
• help this physically disabled move from emotional and physical frailty to becoming successful passionate business owners and to help them create a better future for themselves and their families. We hope to see as many businesses as possible flourish across the country of Ghana and the world at large and most importantly of all, to see these businesses become both profitable yet sustainable!
• compliment government’s efforts towards reducing poverty in the society.
• achieve the objectives of the Disability Act.
10. FINANCIAL PROPOSAL
As a matter of fact the finances are coming from our own sources but as the vision progresses we hope to get both local and international donors to help us accomplish the full extension of the programmes we have envisaged.